Sustainable Diva: Why fashion is taking it slow




What’s trending this season? Fast fashion is out and sustainable fashion is in, writes Caroline S. Asante, Velvet’s contributing sustainability editor

Sustainable Diva - Sustainable Fashion, October 2021 (51100671)
Sustainable Diva - Sustainable Fashion, October 2021 (51100671)

As the weather changes, winter ahead of us, it may be tempting to seek out and purchase those online last-season shopping bargains you may or may not wear.

Unknowingly, you are contributing to fast fashion, the world’s second most polluting industry after oil. The buy-now-maybe-wear-throw-away-later fashion habit is wrecking our planet.

Online shopping in the UK has seen exponential growth over the last 12 months due to the lockdown, and as consumers are bombarded with an endless buffet of online sales, targeted bot-adverts, and sign-up box emails for better deals.

FOMO (fear of missing out) is rife on social media and is fuelling non-sustainable fashion impulse purchases led by an army of Instagram influencers on daily clothes-change.

Fast fashion is big business but is bigger still at escalating climate change due to the 1.2 billion tonnes of greenhouse gas emissions it produces each year. Over the past few years some larger fashion brands have learnt their lesson, having been caught red-handed destroying unsold clothing which directly contributes to this.

However, it is not all doom and gloom. Circular and sustainable fashion and accessories are now firmly in the mainstream. Sustainability which once seemed to mean drab, boring, 50 shades of beige and pale green clothing, is now on the rebrand itself with more colourful and fashion sassy options.

Here are three East Anglian sustainable fashion projects, brands and methods making a difference to the sustainable fashion movement.

Sustainable Diva - Sustainable Fashion, October 2021 (51100669)
Sustainable Diva - Sustainable Fashion, October 2021 (51100669)

New U is a unique boutique style shop in central Norwich offering quality pre-loved clothing and accessories. They hold regular swap shop Saturdays.

@thenorwichswapshop

Sustainable Diva - Sustainable Fashion, October 2021 (51100670)
Sustainable Diva - Sustainable Fashion, October 2021 (51100670)

Way of Tea is a Norwich-based clothing company using natural dyes such as flowers, plants, coffee and, of course, tea to colour its hand-made range of organic textiles and clothing using a circular fashion model of pre-loved or upcycled haberdashery items.

thewayoftea.co.uk

Sustainable Diva - Sustainable Fashion, October 2021 Credit: Anna Gyam (51100649)
Sustainable Diva - Sustainable Fashion, October 2021 Credit: Anna Gyam (51100649)

3 Me by Amma Gyan is a Hertfordshire-based design house using ethically sourced textile remnants to make a range of floor pouffes and leather scraps otherwise going to landfill into jewellery.
wear-me.co.uk

For more on sustainable style visit sustainabledivamag.com. Caroline S. Asante MSc FRSA is the founding editor-in-chief of sustainabledivamag.com. Follow on Instagram @sustainablediva.

**ARTICLE FIRST PUBLISHED OCTOBER 2021**


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